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Top 10 Teen Driving Mistakes

Teen Drivers make a lot of mistakes and are in the realm of being one of the highest demographics that are involved in car accidents.

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There are several reasons that you could think of why teen drivers are involved in more accidents, but here are the top 10 teen driving mistakes

1. Risk taking — Know that it can happen to you. Car crashes are the leading cause of injury and death for people ages 15 to 20. It’s not just about you: Crashes affect pedestrians, passengers and other drivers, as well as their families. You don’t want to do something you’ll regret the rest of your life.

2. Not wearing a seat belt — Use a safety belt and insist that all your passengers do so as well. About two-thirds of teens killed in vehicle crashes were not wearing safety belts. Wearing a seat belt reduces your chances of being hurt or killed in a crash by 45 percent.

3. Speed — Stick to the speed limit. One-third of teen fatalities involve speeding. Obeying the speed limit reduces the severity of a crash you can’t avoid.

4. Rowdy riders — Don’t load up your car with friends. Adding one teen passenger to a vehicle increases a 16- or 17-year-old driver’s crash risk by about 50 percent. With two or more teen passengers, the crash risk increases fivefold.

5. Cell phones — Focus on driving. Save the phone calls, text messaging and other gadgets for after the driving is done. Talking on a cell phone while driving can double reaction time.

6. CD players — Turn the music off while learning to drive. Research shows that adjusting the radio is the most common distraction for drivers between the ages of 16, and driving and channel-surfing don’t mix.

7. Late-night cruising — Don’t drive late at night. Teen crash rates at night (9 p.m. to 6 a.m.) are twice as high as daytime rates. Obey parental curfews.

8. Driving under the influence — Stay sober. Of 16- to 17-year-old drivers killed in crashes, one in six would have been considered legally intoxicated by adult standards.

9. Peer pressure — Make good choices and don’t be afraid to “speak up.” Before you get in a car with a friend, ask: Is this a person you trust? Is he in the right frame of mind to drive safely? Are you prepared to speak up if he drives dangerously?

10. Overconfidence — Inexperience and overconfidence can lead to crashes when new drivers encounter unfamiliar or unexpected situations. Parents should supervise and monitor their teen drivers, even after they get their license.

Via : Funtuna.com




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